The role of the supervisor in personal hygiene

The role of the supervisor in personal hygiene

Effective supervision is essential to ensure high standards of personal hygiene. Supervisors must lead by Person example, especially in relation to hand washing and wearing protective clothing. Staff should be motivated to observe the highest standards. Glo-Germ or hand swabs may prove useful. Supervisors must ensure that the appropriate facilitates are provided and that soap, paper towels, clean protective clothing and a supply of water proof plasters are always available. ¬†They will assist in the implementation and the communication of the food business’s personal hygiene policy and procedures through, for example, training sessions (one-to-one and group), and staff meetings. Supervisors should provide clear instruction and training of staff, including arranging induction and refresher training. Training and instruction should emphasise matters such as the correct hand washing procedure, avoidance of bad personal habits, and individual responsibility to follow sickness reporting, reporting protective clothing and jewellery policies. Posters and notices may be provided to remind food handlers of their personal hygiene responsibilities.

ADD PHOTO OF A EXAMPLE OF A CORRECT HAND WASHING AREA IN A FOOD AREA.

ADD A PHOTO OF A EXAMPLE OF A INCORRECT HAND WASHING AREA IN A FOOD AREA.

Supervisors who are involved in interviewing potential food handlers should ensure interviewees are smart and clean, free of skin infections and have no health problems which could expose food to the risk of contamination. Hands should be clean and nails short, not bitten. They should demonstrate a good attitude towards hygiene, a willingness to undergo training and not wear excessive jewellery or makeup.

Supervisors should check that food handlers understand personal hygiene rules. For example, the supervisor may ask an employee to demonstrate the correct hand wash procedure. Monitoring included spot visual checks throughout the day that correct hand washing procedures are being practised and that clean protective clothing is being correctly worn. Supervisors may carry out random swab tests of hands a record the results. Supervisors should periodically check that sickness reporting rules are being followed, and that the health questionnaires and other due-diligence are being kept and fully completed. If, for example, hand swabbing results or visual spot checks indicates failures in personal hygiene, then the supervisor must take corrective action. Examples of corrective action include retraining and team briefings. Supervisors may need to report to management defects in personal hygiene facilities, for example, inadequate provision in soap and paper towels. Supervisors should discipline, as a last resort, food handlers who deliberately or consultancy flout hygiene rules.

You have now completed the Personal hygiene in food safety¬†course, carry on to our Spearheaad eLearning end of course quiz…

Good luck!